Hope for Chucunaque

English

First Jaguar in Panama
fitted with GPS transmitter

After years of catching jaguars only in camera-trap images, Ricardo Moreno, STRI research associate and National Geographic Emerging Explorer, and a team of 20 biologists and community members were able to catch a jaguar and fit it with a transmitter that will help researchers conserve these majestic cats in the wild. 

Story location

Darien
Images credit: Yaguará Panamá

Conservation Biology Animal Behavior Zoology Biodiversity Sustaining a Biodiverse Planet First Jaguar in Panama Fitted with GPS Transmitter brown Patrick A. Jansen
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Hope for
Chucunaque

First Jaguar in Panama Fitted with GPS Transmitter

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Night hunters

English

Bats use private and social
information as they hunt

As some of the most savvy and sophisticated predators out there, bats eavesdrop on their prey and even on other bats to collect a wide variety of information about their prey.

Story location

Text by Beth King
Cover photo by Merlin Tuttle

Animal Behavior Zoology Evolutionary Biology Natural History Biodiversity Origins of Species and Societies Gamboa Bats use private and social information as they hunt brown Rachel Page
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Night
hunters

Bats use private and social information as they hunt

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Special events

English

STRI Commemorates Panama City’s 500th Anniversary, Jeremy Jackson Elected to NAS, Golden Frog Festival 2019 and more

STRI Commemorates Panama City’s 500th Anniversary, Jeremy Jackson Elected to NAS, Golden Frog Festival 2019 and more

Story location

Panamá

special_events_august_thumbnail brown
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Special
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Jeremy Jackson

English
Paleontology and Paleobiology Conservation Biology

“There are no important questions today for understanding how the Earth works - ecologically, evolutionary, geochemically, oceanographically, meteorologically - that can be answered by a single person, or by a single discipline. All of the great questions are interdisciplinary. All of them require multiple kinds of expertise and all of them require teamwork and interaction.”

Jeremy Jackson
STRI Coral Reef

My research interests have evolved from a strict focus on the ecology of coral reefs to paleontological investigations of the evolution of Caribbean marine ecosystems in response to environmental change and finally towards elucidating the causes and consequences of past and ongoing human activities on the health of ocean ecosystems. I co-founded with Tony Coates a multidisciplinary international research team to document the ecological responses of Caribbean marine ecosystems to changes in oceanography due to the gradual isolation of the Caribbean by the rise of the Central American Isthmus and am continuing research on the underlying factors responsible for evolutionary change in select lineages and the mass extinction that occurred at the beginning of the Pleistocene. My  other current focus is on historical ecology, more specifically in demonstrating the trajectory and ecological consequences of different human activities on the structure and function of ocean ecosystems over the past few thousand years.

How do different factors interact to cause a mass extinction?

Paleontologists traditionally look for prominent environmental events to explain pulses of speciation and extinction in the fossil record. But ecological insight suggests that a more complex series of cascading events stretching over a million years or more are most likely responsible, including not only environmental change but also biological interactions and the phenomenon of ‘extinction debt’ developed for conservation biology. I am examining changes in functional biology and life history patterns to better understand the chronology of Caribbean extinctions over the past 5 million years.

Why does the Indo-West Pacific have so many more species than the Caribbean?

Our recent work on bryozoans demonstrates that species richness was similar in both regions 5 million years ago, and the same was apparently true for reef corals.  Ongoing work suggests that the Mediterranean host similar species diversity before it dried up at about the same time. The obvious implication is that the great differences in species diversity today between the Caribbean and Mediterranean versus the Indo-West Pacific is due mass extinction in the Caribbean and Mediterranean rather than, has long been speculated, higher speciation rates in the Pacific.

How and when has the trajectory of human activities on the oceans transitioned from predominantly local to global impacts and what is their relative importance today?

We have long known that fishing intensified sufficiently by the time of the Roman Empire to drastically deplete Mediterranean fish stocks but have only recently documented the deep historical roots of overfishing worldwide. My group is working to untangle the history of human disturbance and the comparative consequences, of fishing, land use, habitat destruction, pollution, and climate change on Caribbean coral reef ecosystems. The central question is to what extent local management to regulate and diminish fishing, habitat destruction, and pollution on coral reefs can increase their resilience to coral bleaching, disease, and acidification due to the anthropogenic rise in CO2?

How distinct is the Caribbean marine biota from other tropical seas?

The Caribbean is a Mediterranean sea landlocked to the north, west, and south, and isolated from all other tropical oceans for 5 to 3 million years. Biotas in many groups are also deeply divergent as demonstrated especially for reef corals, but also for other groups such as bryozoans. I am interested in the extent to which this isolation has affected the ability of Caribbean biotas to cope with human disturbance. For example, the recent supposedly global extreme coral bleaching events did not occur in the Caribbean, whereas disease outbreaks appear to be more pervasive and fatal to Caribbean invertebrates such as corals and sea urchins than elsewhere in the tropics.

B. A. The George Washington University, 1965

M. A. The George Washington University, 1968

M. Phil. Yale University, 1970

Ph. D. Yale University, 1971

DiMartino E, Jackson JBC, Taylor PD, Johnson KG (2018) Differences in extinction rates drove modern geographic patters of tropical marine biodiversity. Science Advances 4, eaaq150

Jackson JBC, Chapple S. (2018) Breakpoint: Reckoning with America’s Environmental Crises. Yale University Press

McClenachan L, O’Connor G, Neal BP, Pandolfi JM, Jackson JBC (2017) Ghost reefs: Nautical Charts document large spatial scale reef loss over 240 years. Science Advances 3: e1603155.

Simpson C, Jackson JBC, Hererra-Cubilla (2017) Evolutionary determinants of morphological    polymorphism in colonial animals. The American Naturalist 190:

 Jackson JBC, Donovan M, Cramer K, Lam V (eds) (2014) Status and trends of Caribbean coral reefs: 1970-2012. International Union for the Conservation of Nature, Gland, Switzerland.

O’Dea A, Lessios, Coates AG, Eytan RI, et al. and Jackson JBC (2016) Formation of the Isthmus of Panama. Science Advances 2:e1600883:12 pp

O’Dea A, Lessios, Coates AG, Eytan RI, et al. and Jackson JBC (2016) Formation of the Isthmus of Panama. Science Advances 2:e1600883:12 pp

Cramer K, Jackson JBC, Angioletti C, Leonard-Pingell J & Guilderson T (2012) Anthropogenic mortality on coral reefs in Caribbean Panama predates coral disease and bleaching. Ecology Letters doi: 10.1111/j.1461-0248.2012.01768.x

Jackson JBC & Jacquet J (2011) The shifting baselines syndrome: perception, deception, and the future of our oceans. Pp. 128-141 in Ecosystem Approaches to Fisheries: A Global Perspective, V  Christensen & J Maclean (eds) Cambridge University Press

Jackson JBC, Alexander K, Sala E (eds.) (2011) Shifting Baselines in Fisheries: Using the Past to Manage the Future. Island Press, Washington DC

Smith JT & Jackson JBC (2009) Ecology of extreme faunal turnover of tropical American scallops. Paleobiology 35:77-93

Johnson KG, Jackson JBC, & Budd AF (2008) Caribbean reef development was independent of coral diversity over 28 million years. Science 319:1521-1523

Jackson JBC (2008) Evolution and extinction in the brave new ocean. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences USA 105 (Suppl. 1):11458-11465

Lotze HK, Lenihan HS, Bourque BJ, Bradbury RH, Cooke RG, Kay MC, Kidwell SM, Kirby MX, Peterson CH & Jackson JBC (2006) Depletion, degradation, and recovery potential of estuaries and coastal seas. Science 312:1806-1809

Jackson JBC and 17 others (2001) Historical overfishing and the recent collapse of coastal ecosystems. Science 293:629-638

jjackson [at] amnh.org
+1 (858) 518-7613
Jeremy Jackson
brown
Scientist Type: 
Emeritus

Name

Jeremy

Last name

Jackson

Skeleton stories

English

The bone whisperer

From understanding the origin of ancient diseases to correcting misinterpretations of archaeological evidence, STRI bioarchaeologist Nicole Smith-Guzman opens a window into the intricacies of pre-Columbian life in Panama

Story location

Panama
Text by Leila Nilipour, STRI

Archaeology Anthropology Historical Ecology Life in Deep Time Naos The bone whisperer brown Richard Cooke
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Skeleton
stories

The bone whisperer

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Empathy

English

Insects need empathy

Yves Basset, who heads insect monitoring efforts for the Smithsonian ForestGEO program and Greg Lamarre, from the University of South Bohemia, present immediate, science-based actions that mitigate insect decline.

Story location

Panamá

Entomology Conservation Biology Biodiversity Animal Behavior Taxonomy Sustaining a Biodiverse Planet Earl S. Tupper Insects need empathy brown Yves Basset
Insects need empathy

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Leaf detective

English

Searching for clues
among fossilized leaves

Analyzing the fossil vegetation from millions of years ago, Mónica Carvalho seeks to understand the environmental conditions that led to the evolution of Neotropical forests as we know them today.

Story location

Text by Leila Nilipour

Paleontology and Paleobiology Global Change Botany Forest Ecology Life in Deep Time CTPA Leaf detective brown Carlos Jaramillo
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Leaf
detective

Leaf detective

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A life in archaeology

English

The regional trace of Richard Cooke is recognized in a Costa Rican anthropology magazine

The trajectory of the renowned archaeologist of the Smithsonian Institution in Panama spans half a century and has had a tremendous impact in the field of Central American archeology and the careers of dozens of researchers. A magazine from the University of Costa Rica honors him.

Archaeology Anthropology Origins of Species and Societies A life in archaeology brown
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A life
in archaeology

A life in archaeology

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