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Smithsonian Tropical Research Institute

Punta Culebra during COVID-19

May 13, 2020

While we stay home waiting for the pandemic to pass, the animals at the Nature Center wait patiently for the day when we can visit them again

Smithsonian Tropical Research Institute

The value of science during times of crisis

May 08, 2020
Smithsonian Tropical Research Institute

Will the poor bear the brunt of coronavirus in Latin America and the Caribbean?

May 06, 2020

Different socio-economic conditions and lack of clean water may change the dynamics of COVID-19 transmission in Latin America and the Caribbean.

Smithsonian Tropical Research Institute

Courtship movements put katydids in danger

April 30, 2020

Females may also be prone to predation as they move toward a mating call

Smithsonian Tropical Research Institute

Monkey party?

April 29, 2020

White-faced capuchin monkeys come down from the trees on Panama’s Coiba island

Smithsonian Tropical Research Institute

Are city ants weaker?

April 16, 2020

To understand the effects of urbanization and forest loss on insects, Dumas Gálvez studies the ability of ants to defend themselves against diseases in the city and in nature

Smithsonian Tropical Research Institute

What do we know about Darien's forests?

April 15, 2020

A scientific mission in the Panamanian jungle found some of the largest trees in the country

Smithsonian Tropical Research Institute

Bocas dolphins may be more sociable while we shelter in place

April 13, 2020

A study of dolphin behavior in the presence of tourist boats informs conservation efforts.

Smithsonian Tropical Research Institute

Science and universal education for tackling climate change

March 25, 2020

The world economy is based on increased population and consumption, and education has an important impact on reducing this

Smithsonian Tropical Research Institute

Even fake illness affects relationships among vampire bats

March 12, 2020

How do social interactions change in the face of illness? As humans face potential global pandemics we look to nature for examples. Close observation of another highly social animal, the vampire bat, sheds light on how interactions change—or do not change—as individuals become sick.

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