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CTFS book on the trees of one of Thailand's wildlife sanctuaries

July 13, 2009

CTFS book on the trees of one of Thailand's wildlife sanctuaries

The National Parks, Wildlife and Plant Conservation Department of Thailand has just published the book Forest trees of Huai Kha Khaeng Wildlife Sanctuary, Thailand: Data from the 50-hectare Forest Dynamic Plot (2009)

The National Parks, Wildlife and Plant Conservation Department of Thailand has just published the book Forest trees of Huai Kha Khaeng Wildlife Sanctuary, Thailand: Data from the 50-hectare Forest Dynamic Plot (2009), authored by Sarayudh Bunyavejchewin, James V. LaFrankie, Patrick J. Baker, Stuart J. Davies and Peter S. Ashton, researchers for STRI's Center for Tropical Forest Science (CTFS).

The Huai Kha Khaeng Wildlife Sanctuary is one of Thailand's iconic conservation reserves. Located in western Thailand, the Huai Kha Khaeng WS and its neighbor, the Thung Yai- Naresuan Wildlife Sanctuary, form the core of Thailand's Western Forest Complex, the largest area of protected wilderness in continental Southeast Asia. These World Heritage Sites support a landscape mosaic of deciduous and evergreen forests that harbor a remarkable diversity of plants and animals. Tigers, elephants, clouded leopards, gaur, and banteng all roam the forests of Huai Kha Khaeng and the Western Forest Complexˇ some of the finest examples of seasonal tropical forests in continental Southeast Asia.

Over the past 18 years research scientists from the Thai Royal Forest Department, the Thai National Parks, Wildlife and Plant Conservation Department, STRI's Center for Tropical Forest Science (CTFS) and Harvard University have been studying the species-rich seasonal dry evergreen forest at the Huai Kha Khaeng Wildlife Sanctuary.

This book presents, in unprecedented detail, a description of the structure, composition and dynamics of one of Thailand's most diverse forest types. Future generations of botanists, ecologists, foresters, and conservationists will be able to use this book as a reference point to assess potential future impacts on these forests and to guide the management of this wonderful natural heritage.

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